Summer Learning

Prepare for Next Year With Our Summer Learning Programs

We are so thrilled that you are continuing your educational path with The Galloway School.  We are so excited to be your teachers next year.  We have listed a few things to practice over the summer to prepare you for greatness.

Select your incoming grade.

Dear Future Third Grade Students and Parents,

Welcome to third grade at The Galloway School. We are looking forward to teaching such an awesome group of students in the fall. We have prepared some summer practices in this packet to keep your skills fresh and sharp over the summer.  

During the summer, every incoming third grader will be required to read a book about a famous scientist or inventor of your choice. Please take notes and be ready to complete a project on this book at the beginning of the school year. Directions for this project will be given during the first few weeks of 3rd grade.

Challenge yourself this summer to read like you have never read before. Attached is a list of suggested books to read for fun. Log the books read on your Reading-Rewards online log. You can also blog with your classmates about what they are reading this summer. We are looking forward to a fantastic school year and we can’t wait to have you in class.

Your Third Grade Team

 

Reading Readiness

  • Spelling and Handwriting
    • Cursive is introduced in 3rd grade. Please practice uppercase and lowercase letters (you can download a free cursive writing app on the student’s device.)
    • Write your sight words five times to help practice with handwriting.
    • Use a dictionary to find the definition of each word and write it down.
  • Sight Word list 25 located on later in packet. (work on no more than 3 words a week)
    • Practice sight words by using flash cards.
    • Find the part of speech for each sight word. Rewrite each word using blue for a noun, green for a verb, red for an adjective and yellow for an adverb.
    • Find the sight words in books.
  • Challenge: Write two sentences for each new word.  Underline the nouns. verbs, adverbs, and adjectives in your sentences using the appropriate colors mentioned above.
  • Sight Word list 25 located on back. (work on no more than 3 words a week)
  • Reading comprehension
    • Read/listen to stories daily. Use the questions located on the back to discuss.
    • Practice telling another member your favorite part of the story and why.
    • Practice retelling the story including important characters and main ideas.
  • Challenge: Write 5 or more sentences and draw about what you read.

Ex. I like…, I think…

  • Use IXL to practice grammar skills
    • Practice identifying nouns, verbs, adverbs and adjectives in a sentence
    • Identify sentence types (question, command, exclamation, or statement)

Math Readiness

  • Use IXL Math to practice your math skills
  • Counting and Multiplication
    • Practice skip-counting by numbers (2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10)
    • Practice writing numbers in word form.
    • Practice identifying patterns in a number sequence.
    • Use a times table and flashcards to start practicing your multiplication facts.
  • Challenge: Complete a multiplication problems worksheet using a times table for math facts 1-12
  • Number operations
    • Practice recognizing place values of ones, tens, hundreds, thousands and ten thousands.
    • Identify even and odd numbers.
    • Compare two numbers using the greater than or less than signs (<, >)
    • Order numbers from least to greatest and greatest to least. (Give the student a list of numbers and have them rewrite the numbers from least to greatest and greatest to least.)
    • Practice adding and subtracting by 2 digits (ex. 24 + 53 = )
    • Challenge: Add and subtract numbers up to 3 digits.
    • Practice rounding numbers to the nearest hundreds, tens and ones place.
    • Students should be able to identify coins and dollar amounts, and be able to count money.  -Having a bank and counting their money is good practice as well as paying for items themselves and to figure out their change.
    • Students are expected to be able to tell time on a standard clock as well as digital clock.  To help your child with standard clock faces, a suggestion may be to purchase a watch for your child and ask them to tell you what time it is.

Summer Reading Fun

There are so many wonderful books that are just waiting to be read. Your family might have a great vacation planned or you may be staying at home all summer. What better way to travel to a faraway place than through a book! Over the summer, set a reading goal for yourself. A recent study found that kids who read four or more books over the summer do better in school in the fall.

Summer Reading Assignment

Choose a famous scientist or inventor to read a chapter book about. This will also be the character your child will portray on museum day. (ex: George Washington Carver, Amelia Earhart, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, Margaret E. Knight.) Your child will complete a project over this person when they return to school in the fall.  

“Thinking about Reading Questions”

Use these questions to talk about the books you read with your child.  Ask these questions for each book your child reads this summer.

  1. Who are the characters in the story?  What was their part in the story?
  2. Tell setting of the story?
  3. Talk about what you see in the pictures.
  4. Retell the story with a beginning, middle, and end.
  5. What was the problem in the story and how was it solved?
  6. Tell something you like about the book and why.
  7. Does this story remind you of something that has happened in your life?
  8. What is the genre of the story?

25 High Frequency words

  1. Between     10. without          19. group
  2. Listen     11. almost          20. different
  3. Laugh     12. found          21. around
  4. Really     13. important          22. second
  5. Sometimes     14. together          23. enough
  6. again     15. Young          24. across
  7. though     16. Example          25.question
  8. before     17. beautiful
  9. answer     18. through

 

Reminders:

*Your reading rewards website will be available all summer long. It is a great way to share and blog about the book that you are reading.
www.reading-rewards.com

*A great website to review any Reading, Language Arts, Social Studies, or Science is the IXL website. The address is: www.ixl.com Feel free to practice any of the subjects.

*Begin working on your penmanship. Cursive writing is introduced in the 3rd grade. A great website to visit is: http://www.kidzone.ws/cursive/   

Summer Prep for 3rd Grade Math

Mastery of math skills is important to the development of a solid math foundation.  The 3rd grade math program will add on to these 2nd grade skills so that any time spent learning or reinforcing these concepts will be very beneficial for your child.  Each year builds upon the previous year’s skills in math.  Your child may require additional practice in basic math skills.  Student mastery of the basic math skills is as important to success in future mathematical procedures and reasoning as learning the alphabet is to learning to read and write.  We suggest 60 to 90 minutes of practice per week to maintain current skills and prepare for next grade level.

The chart below provides optional practice for your child to complete over the summer:

Math Expectation 2nd Grade IXL
Understand place value up to 100,000 M.7, M.12, M.13
Addition/Subtraction:  2 digits by 2 digits and 3 digits by 3 digits G.1-G.16, H.1-H.12, I.1-I.8, J.1-J.8
Estimation to 10,000 N.1-N.5
Identify coins and bills/ Add and subtract up to $1 P.6, P.8, P.10, P.11, P.12, P.13, P.14, P.15
Skip count, ordinal numbers (1st, 2nd, 3rd…), even, odd A.1, A.2, A.3, A.10, A.11
Classify 2- and 3-dimensional geometric shapes T.1, T.2, T.3, U.1, U.2, U.3
Read and write times, compare clocks, elapsed time and time patterns Q.4, Q.8, Q.9, Q.10, Q.11
Interpret bar, line and pictographs (Challenge: Create your own graphs) R.2, R.4, R.5, R.6, R.7, R.14
Use customary and metric conversions S.1-S.15
Find the area and perimeter of a square / rectangle V.1, V.2, V.3
Multiplication and Division facts up to 10 (Challenge up to 12) Y.1, Y.5, Y.11
Fractions W.1, W.3, W.5, W.10
Division Z.1, Z.2


Make math fun!  Find different ways to “work” math into your days.  

Reading/Texas History

  1. Two great book to read during the summer are:  Make Way for Sam Houston by Jean Fritz and A Paradise Called Texas by Janice Jordan Shefelman.  

These are not only great reads, but it will prepare you for your Texas History adventure next school year.  These books can be found at any local library or even Barnes and Noble.  Feel free to grab a journal and take notes if you want to and ask these questions:  Before, During, and After each book.

Before Reading:

Questions Strategy
What do you think this book is about?  Why do you think that?  What characters do you think are in this book? Predicting
What do you know about the topic?  Does it remind you of any ting? Connecting
What questions would you like to ask the author before you read this book? What are you wondering about as you look at the cover and back of your book? Questioning


During Reading:

Questions Strategy
What do you think will happen next? Why?  How do you think the character will handle this situation? Predicting
Why do you think the character did __________________? How do you know?  What must have happened here that the author didn’t tell us? What emotions is the character feeling? How do you know? Inferring
What would you have done if you were the character? Has anything like this ever happened to you? Does it remind you of something?  How would you have felt if that happened to you? Do you know someone like this character? How are you like/different than this character? Connecting
As you’ve been reading, what pictures have been in your mind?  If you were in the story, what would you hear, taste, smell or feel?  What does the character/setting look like in your mind?  Tell me what you were imagining in your mind as you read that page/paragraph. Visualizing
Is there anything you’re wondering about right now? Questioning
Can you put what you’ve just read in your own words?  What’s happened to this character so far?  Tell me the most important things you read today in order of how they happened. Summary
What does this word mean?  Is this making sense to you?  Do you need to reread that part? Monitoring Comprehension


After Reading:

Questions Strategy
What is the main message of this book? What does the author want you to think about? What was the big idea? Inferring
What questions would you like to ask the author right now? Questioning
Tell me the story in your own words.  Retell the most important events in the story from beginning, middle and end. Summarizing
What were the most important events in this story? Determining Importance
  1. We would also like for you to read and research your person for The Living History Day Museum.  This will get you a jump start on your project.
Noor – Millie Bailey Luis – Stephan F. Austin
Aayush – Davy Crockett Rasl – Mirabeau B. Lamar
Sabrina – Sally Scull Hossam – Jose Antonio Navarro
Zara – Cynthia Ann Parker Sohan – William B. Travis
Darielle – Elisabet Ney Gaurav – Anson Jones
Ruhan -Antonio de Santa Anna Xavier – Lorenzo de Zavala
Natalie – Jane Long Lara – Susanna Dickinson
Dereon – James Bowie Hazel – Cynthia Ann Parker
Mahika – Sam Houston extra – James Fannin
  1. Your Reading Rewards website will be available all summer long.  It is a great way to share and blog about the book that you are reading. www.readingrewards.com
  2. A great website to review any Reading, Language Arts, Social Studies, or Science is the IXL website.  The address is:   www.ixl.com  feel free to practice any of the subjects.
  3. Continue to practice on your penmanship.  Cursive writing is a priority in 4th Grade.  Websites to visit are:  http://www.kidzone.ws/cursive/  and   http://www.kidzone.ws/cursive/  

Have a wonderful summer.  We look forward to working together and creating wonderful minds.

Reading/Colonial History  

  1. A great book to read during the summer is:  Midnight Rider by:   Joan Hiatt Harlow

This will help prepare you for your Williamsburg trip next school year.  This book can be found at any local library or even Barnes and Noble.  Feel free to grab a journal and take notes if you want to and ask these questions before, during, and after you read the book.

Before Reading:

Questions Strategy
What do you think this book is about?  Why do you think that?  What characters do you think are in this book? Predicting
What do you know about the topic?  Does it remind you of any ting? Connecting
What questions would you like to ask the author before you read this book? What are you wondering about as you look at the cover and back of your book? Questioning


During Reading:

Questions Strategy
What do you think will happen next? Why?  How do you think the character will handle this situation? Predicting
Why do you think the character did __________________? How do you know?  What must have happened here that the author didn’t tell us? What emotions is the character feeling? How do you know? Inferring
What would you have done if you were the character? Has anything like this ever happened to you? Does it remind you of something?  How would you have felt if that happened to you? Do you know someone like this character? How are you like/different than this character? Connecting
As you’ve been reading, what pictures have been in your mind?  If you were in the story, what would you hear, taste, smell or feel?  What does the character/setting look like in your mind?  Tell me what you were imagining in your mind as you read that page/paragraph. Visualizing
Is there anything you’re wondering about right now? Questioning
Can you put what you’ve just read in your own words?  What’s happened to this character so far?  Tell me the most important things you read today in order of how they happened. Summary
What does this word mean?  Is this making sense to you?  Do you need to reread that part? Monitoring Comprehension


After Reading:

Questions Strategy
What is the main message of this book? What does the author want you to think about? What was the big idea? Inferring
What questions would you like to ask the author right now? Questioning
Tell me the story in your own words.  Retell the most important events in the story from beginning, middle and end. Summarizing
What were the most important events in this story? Determining Importance
  1. We would also like for you to read and research your person for The Living History Day Museum.  This will get you a jump start on your project.  If you go to the website www.colonialwilliamsburg.com and go to the “history” tab, it will let you search the people of the time period.
Audrey – Annabelle Powell Kendal – James Monroe
Samad – Lord Dunmore (John Murray) Emily – Benjamin Powell
Sophia – Martha Wahington Sidra – Sir John Randolph
Faith – John Robinson Nicholas – George Washington
Naresh – Abraham Lincoln Andrea -Lady Dunmore (Charlotte Murray)
Haley – George Wythe Jolie – Catherine Blaikley
Mariam – Edmund Randolph Lexi – Robert Carter Nicholas
Kylee – John Robinson Evan – Benedict Arnold
Vishank – Patrick Henry Christopher – Francis Fauquier
Diya – Ann Wager Vamshika – James Geddy
Asa – Peter Pelham Tanya – William Holt
Sreeja – Thomas Jefferson Ashita – Ann Geddy
Alexandra -Lady Susannah Beverly Randolph New student 1 – Catherine Blaikley

 

  1. Please go to the website www.colonialwilliamsburg.com and become familiar with the trades that people were taught, who could practice that trade, and facts about that trade.  This will help you become familiar with the timeperiod.
  2. Your Reading Rewards website will be available all summer long.  It is a great way to share and blog about the book that you are reading. www.readingrewards.com
  3. A great website to review any Reading, Language Arts, Social Studies, or Science is the IXL website.  The address is:   www.ixl.com  feel free to practice any of the subjects.

Math

Mastery of math skills is important to the development of a solid math foundation.  The 5th grade math program will add on to these 4th grade skills so that any time spent learning or reinforcing these concepts will be very beneficial for your child.  Each year builds upon the previous year’s skills in math.  Your child may require additional practice in basic math skills.  Student mastery of the basic math skills is as important to success in future mathematical procedures and reasoning as learning the alphabet is to learning to read and write.  We suggest 60 to 90 minutes of practice per week to maintain current skills and prepare for next grade level.

The chart below provides optional practice for your child to complete over the summer:

Math Expectation 4th Grade IXL
Understand place value up to one billion A.3, A.7, A.8, A.15
Multiplication facts up to 12 (Challenge up to 15) D.1, D.2
List the first 12 multiples of a given number D.3
Know prime versus composite numbers A.10, A.11
Add, subtract and multiply whole numbers fluently B.1, C.1, D.18
Divide numbers up to 4-digits by 1-digit E.4
Use a number line with whole numbers, common fractions and decimals to the tenths place P.6, T.8
Read, write, interpret and compare decimal places to the hundredths place T.1, T.2, T.3, T.4
Covert between mixed numbers and improper fractions P.23
Compare and order up to three fractions with different denominators P.17, P.21
Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators R.2, R.4
Add and subtract decimals up to two places U.1, U.2
Use customary and metric conversions N.6, N.15
Find the area and perimeter of a shape BB.1, BB.7, BB.11
Find the side of a shape given its perimeter or area BB.6
Identify basic geometric shapes W.2, X.4
Identify faces, edges, and vertices of 3D solids AA.2, AA.3, AA.4
Identify perpendicular, parallel, and intersecting lines W.5
Recognize plane figures that have line symmetry Y.1, Y.2
Construct tables and bar graphs from given data J.1, J.4, J.5
Find the median and range of a set of data V.4


Make math fun!  Find different ways to “work” math into your days.